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Article
February 18, 1911

THE RELATION OF THE TEETH TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE JAWS AND FACE

JAMA. 1911;LVI(7):473-477. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560070005002
Abstract

In considering the structure of all multicellular organisms, and, in fact, in the very simplest aggregations of cells into tissues, it becomes apparent that there are two essential parts: the cells, which are the vital units; and intercellular substances, which give the physical characteristics to the tissue. The latter are always material which have been produced by the vital activity of the protoplasm, but which are not living matter; that is, they have no vital properties but are dependent on the protoplasm for formation and for the maintenance of their chemical character. In tissues, the vital characteristics are given to the protoplasm by the cells, the physical characteristics by the intercellular substance. Protoplasm, which has long since been recognized as the physical basis of life, is always of a soft and more or less gelatinous character, and of it alone, nothing resembling a highly organized creature could be formed. Other

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