[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.204.247.205. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 18, 1911

ELECTRIC ANALGESIA, AND ELECTRIC RESUSCITATION AFTER HEART FAILURE UNDER CHLOROFORM OR ELECTROCUTION

JAMA. 1911;LVI(7):478-481. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560070010003
Abstract

Electric analgesia was applied successfully for the first time, in animal, then in human surgery, by myself. Successful local application of this analgesia in human surgery is reported by Dr. M. M. Johnson.1 I administered this analgesia. I have reported successful application of this analgesia in animal surgery and electric sleep in clinical work in all the issues of the Journal of Mental Pathology, commencing with 1906. The part of this paper treating of electric analgesia and sleep will be published elsewhere for reason of want of space here.

It is possible to resuscitate, by means of electric currents, subjects in a condition of apparent death caused by chloroform, ether, morphin, electrocution, etc. The first important researches into resuscitation of electrocuted subjects were made at about the same time by Professor Battelli2 in Europe, and Dr. R. H. Cunningham, in this country.3 Both authors used enormous currents

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×