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Article
March 10, 1888

THE RELATIONS OF THE MEDICAL PROFESSION TO THE PUBLIC.

JAMA. 1888;X(10):300-301. doi:10.1001/jama.1888.02400360016004

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Abstract

There seems to be a growing tendency on the part of the newspapers to gratify a morbid public curiosity and craving for harrowing and sickening details, however much individuals may suffer thereby, or however innocent the individual may be of having committed wrong or omitted right doing. And with this tendency there is another, almost as vicious, of the newspaper's presuming on the ignorance of intelligent readers, and neglecting to take measures to cure its own ignorance. In short, newspaper policy seems to be tending more and more to a reversal of the Golden Rule—which is just as good to-day as it was two thousand years ago—and one may sum it up as "Do unto others as you would not be done by."

But what has this to do with the relations of the medical profession to the public? So much: That physicians should see to it that when the

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