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Article
April 14, 1888

ANTISEPTIC INHALATIONS IN PULMONARY DISEASES.

Author Affiliations

OF WASHINGTON, D. C., MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN AND OF THE BRITISH MEDICAL ASSOCIATIONS, AND VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY, OF WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1888;X(15):445-452. doi:10.1001/jama.1888.02400410001001

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Abstract

In the treatment of pulmonary complaints the tendency at the present time is towards local medication. This arises principally from the general acceptation of the germ theory, which teaches in the main that diseases originate from microörganisms; and the belief that from this it must follow, as a necessity, that these microörganisms must be destroyed or rendered harmless to organized tissues, either as a means of cure or as a prophylaxis to such disease. It is from the supposition that those microörganisms known as bacilli exist in the lungs in tubercular disease, and that their destruction eventually becomes necessary in order to cure the pathological condition recognized as tuberculosis, that the study of antiseptic or germicidal inhalations have for the past few years received more than usual attention. The presence of the tubercular bacillus, made renowned by Koch, has been too frequently verified by competent observers to admit of a

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