[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.158.173.184. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 5, 1914

FURTHER OBSERVATIONS ON THE HEMIOPIC PUPILLARY REACTION OBTAINED WITH A NEW CLINICAL INSTRUMENT

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School BOSTON

From the surgical clinic of Prof. Harvey Cushing at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Harvard Medical School.

JAMA. 1914;LXIII(10):846-851. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02570100032010
Abstract

The need of such a test as the hemiopic pupillary reaction, if it holds in cerebral cases any of the topical diagnostic possibilities originally suggested by Heddaeus and later elaborated by Wernicke,1 is so great that no labor should be spared fully to estimate the value of every promise it may offer.

In a paper2 before this Section last year a complete historical summary and bibliography were given of this subject and of the Wilbrand test.3

PREVIOUS OBSERVATIONS  It will suffice here to recall some cardinal points from the researches of previous observers. Most important was the work of Hess in clearly showing what a great stumbling-block the phenomenon of dispersion light within the eye media had been in both making and interpreting observations, and, since it has been frequently noticed in discussion that this phenomenon is still apparently a hazy concept to many, it may be

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×