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Article
February 26, 1916

THE RELATION OF HEMOLYSIS IN THE TRANSFUSION OF BABIES WITH THE MOTHERS AS DONORS

Author Affiliations

Assistant Obstetrician Harlem Hospital; Instructor in Obstetrics, New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital; Serologist, Harlem Hospital NEW YORK

JAMA. 1916;LXVI(9):626-627. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02580350014004
Abstract

The new-born infant is subject occasionally to various pathologic conditions which to combat successfully requires the transfusion of blood. Among these ailments the most frequent and alarming, and perhaps most fatal, is the hemorrhagic disease of the new-born. The occurrence of this disease seems to vary in different institutions and localities. Townsend, collecting his reports from the Boston Lying-In Hospital, found that it occurred in thirty-two infants out of 5,000 births. Ritter found its occurrence in 190 cases out of 13,000 births at the lying-in hospital at Prague. Epstein, at the New York Foundling Hospital, found it in 8 per cent. of infants, while the average treatise of children's diseases gives the proportion of 1 in every 1,000 births.

Clinically this disease can be divided into two classes:

1. Those cases in which hemorrhage may occur from the mucosa of the gastro-intestinal tract, the stump of the cord, and subcutaneously,

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