[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.87.119.171. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 26, 1916

THE RELATION OF THE LABORATORY COURSES TO THE WORK OF THE CLINICAL YEARS

Author Affiliations

Dean and Professor of Physiology of the University of Minnesota Medical School MINNEAPOLIS

JAMA. 1916;LXVI(9):629-631. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02580350017006
Abstract

First, I tried to work out this relation on the family basis. I said, "Medicine is the mother of physiology," and I prepared to come here and paint a pretty picture of physiology taking care of mother in her old age. But when I looked around for father, my trouble began. I found that medicine had a promiscuous lot of children—quite a heterogeneous household ranging all the way from substantial oldest son, anatomy, to sapheaded chiropractic. I became fearful of discovering a scandal and gave up the idea of family relationship.

Then I thought it might work out better on a basis of phylogeny. "I will construct," I said, "a scheme of relationship by descent. I will study the evolution of the medical sciences—develop the tree of race relationship."

The plan looked hopeful. There was the gnarled but sturdy old trunk of medicine extending down into the subsoil of unrecorded

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×