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Article
March 11, 1916

THE LATENT RALE IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF INCIPIENT TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

RAY BROOK, N. Y.

From the New York State Hospital for Incipient Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

JAMA. 1916;LXVI(11):788-791. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02580370008003
Abstract

The term "latent" as here employed designates the râle elicited only by the aid of cough. Any originality is disclaimed in the use of the word latent to designate this type of râle, since Willison1 and others have previously referred to râles elicited by cough as latent signs. In the majority of patients in the early stage of the disease, and in some instances of advanced disease, it is, to the exclusion of all others, the only râle heard. In both the early and the advanced types of lesion, it seems probable that râles of very feeble intensity are produced during forced respiration, which remain inaudible, latent or concealed until cough is employed. This theory receives support in those instances in which indistinct sounds suggesting râles on deep breathing are replaced by demonstrable râles after cough. Special contributions devoted to the diagnosis of incipient pulmonary tuberculosis have specifically indicated

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