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Article
June 16, 1888

THE INFANT-FOOD PROBLEM.Read in the Section on Diseases of Children, at the Thirty-Ninth Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, May 10, 1888.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF DISEASES OF CHILDREN AND SANITARY SCIENCE IN THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE, PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1888;X(24):743-745. doi:10.1001/jama.1888.02400500011001b

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Abstract

To the general practitioner everywhere, there constantly comes the question, What means shall be employed to prevent the terrible mortality among infants deprived of their natural food, the mother's breast-milk? As it is in very many cases impossible to place the child outside the walls of a large city, this want of proper hygienic surroundings acts as one great factor in the production of disease. But perhaps the most active cause of disease is the exhaustion of the vital powers from the want of those articles which, being properly and readily assimilated, aid to maintain the body in its highest and healthiest condition. We all know that, other things being equal, that child which has been able to keep its system in the best state, its blood rich and pure, its muscles plump and firm, is sure to pass through an epidemic of children's affections either entirely unscathed or suffering

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