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Article
April 1, 1911

OBSCURE CASE OF TRAUMATIC SUBDURAL HEMORRHAGE WITHOUT FRACTURE

Author Affiliations

Junior Assistant Physician, Government Hospital for the Insane WASHINGTON. D. C.

JAMA. 1911;LVI(13):956-958. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560130020009
Abstract

In his article on "Pathology of Intracranial Hemorrhage" Spiller1 says: "Subdural hemorrhage has been more frequent in my experience than epidural, and I have repeatedly seen a hemorrhage beneath the cerebral dura as a result of injuries to the head in cases where the skull was not fractured. This occurrence is important to remember, and sometimes the discovery of the subdural hemorrhage comes as a surprise to the operator."

DaCosta2 says that subdural hemorrhage is usually due to depressed fracture and rupture of the middle meningeal artery, or of a number of small vessels.

According to Church and Peterson,3 Cruveilhier asserts that in one-third of the cases of asphyxiated new-born, subdural hemorrhage is the main difficulty. The clots are commonly found over the convexity, and are, in surviving cases, a pregnant source of idiocy and cerebral palsy.

According to DaCosta,2 "most cases of cerebral palsy seen

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