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Article
April 1, 1916

THEORIES OF THE ETIOLOGY OF PERNICIOUS ANEMIA

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Laboratory of Clinical Pathology, Department of Medicine, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons.

JAMA. 1916;LXVI(14):1012-1016. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02580400018008
Abstract

The etiology of pernicious anemia belongs to that pleasant group of subjects which are always agreeable to discuss because our ignorance concerning them is so extensive that it is very easy to have a great deal to say about them. Indeed, when one considers the enormous amount that has been written relating to this disease and the comparatively small kernel of truth which it contains, a certain saying of Goethe's seems particularly appropriate:

Denn eben wo Begriffe fehlen,

Da stellt ein Wort zur rechten Zeit sich ein.1

During the past five years, for various reasons, among others the wider resort to splenectomy and transfusion as measures of treatment, interest in the disease has been greatly stimulated, and there is real difficulty in determining which topics to select for discussion. I must therefore at once disclaim any intention of attempting completeness in what I have to say, and purpose simply

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