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Article
November 14, 1914

SOME FACTORS TENDING TOWARD ADEQUATE INSTRUCTION IN NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASES

Author Affiliations

Professor, Department of Nervous and Mental Diseases, St. Louis University School of Medicine

JAMA. 1914;LXIII(20):1707-1713. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02570200001001
Abstract

The earnest effort on the part of the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association to raise the standard of medical education in the United States has met a gratifying measure of success. Its beneficent influence has been revealed in several directions. One of its achievements is the formulation of a "standard curriculum" through a subcommittee of one hundred medical educators. This curriculum, however, is intended to be entirely educational and suggestive and the "Council does not consider it in the interest of true progress in education that any standard curriculum whatever shall be uniformly adopted by all medical schools." Even though it was not proposed as a fixed standard, formulated as it was by one hundred prominent educators, it receives general recognition and is bound to be used as a model and thus to have definite influence on medical education in this country.

Medical curriculums are doubtless

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