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Article
December 15, 1888

CASES OF SUDDEN DEATH IN NURSING INFANTS.

Author Affiliations

OF GREIFSWALD.

JAMA. 1888;XI(24):853-856. doi:10.1001/jama.1888.02400750025007a
Abstract

The object of this communication is to call attention to a group of cases of death in nursing infants, which are of interest, because healthy children died with the symptoms of suffocation without any preliminary evidences of disease. I have observed two such cases which throw some light concerning the cause of death. According to my idea, a greatly enlarged thymus gland is the real explanation of the sudden asphyxia in both cases.

The first case occurred about four years ago in Berlin. A child about 8 months of age was entrusted to the care of a servant girl. One morning this child, which hitherto had been entirely healthy, was found dead in bed. The feather coverlid, with which the little one was covered, seemed to be drawn somewhat high up over the mouth of the child. On account of these circumstances the attending servant girl was accused by the

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