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Article
June 3, 1916

THE NONPROTEIN NITROGENOUS COMPONENTS OF THE BLOOD

JAMA. 1916;LXVI(23):1781. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02580490029013
Abstract

If the routine detailed analysis of the blood is to prove of value in the future in the field of diagnosis, as urinary analysis has demonstrated its usefulness in the past, it will be necessary to have elaborate fundamental studies of the normal composition of the circulating fluid and its variations under known conditions of physiologic disturbance. Data obtained from this standpoint in respect to the sugar content of the blood have repeatedly been discussed in The Journal.1 Since the introduction of suitable micromethods of analysis, the quantitative aspects of the nonprotein nitrogen of the blood — the index of that fraction of its constituents which includes the circulating amino acids, urea and other products of metabolism — have claimed special attention. The technic of the estimations is beginning to share a place in the larger clinical laboratories and is receiving application in particular in the investigation of renal

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