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Article
July 8, 1916

A REPORT ON NUTRITION IN A GERMAN INTERNMENT CAMP

JAMA. 1916;LXVII(2):125-126. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02590020041016
Abstract

War, with its unexpected emergencies and unique demands, with the sudden needs of maintaining large groups of persons in health and strength under unanticipated conditions, has always presented serious problems of food supply and adequate nutrition on a large scale. The European nations are affording instances of this at the present time. The ingenuities and exigencies of nutrition have more than once been brought to light by a study of the management of civil populations in times of siege and in prison camps, as well as in the field. It is instructive to ascertain how unanticipated situations are met and what are the conditions that need to be combated in a nation left largely to its own limited resources in matters of diet in times of stress.

Particular value attaches, therefore, to observations by an unbiased, competent observer on the conditions of diet and nutrition in the camp of the

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