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Article
July 22, 1916

THE EFFECT OF ACTIVITY ON THE HISTOLOGIC STRUCTURE OF NERVE CELLS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the Henry Phipps Institute of Psychiatry, the Johns Hopkins Medical School, Baltimore, and the George Williams Hooper Foundation for Medical Research, University of California Medical School.

JAMA. 1916;LXVII(4):278-279. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02590040032008
Abstract

It has long been known that prolonged activity of mucous gland cells results in characteristic histologic changes in these cells, owing to the disappearance from the cell of certain granules (zymogen granules). This granular material is evidently used to make organic material of the secretion. It was doubtless on the basis of such observations that certain physiologists were led to seek for similar alterations in the highly specialized nerve cell following functional activity. Many of the investigations of these physiologists were confined to one or two experiments, the material was often not sufficiently controlled by normal tissue for comparison, and frequently the histologic technic was faulty.

There is the utmost divergence of opinion as to the nature of the changes taking place in nerve cells following activity, and one who tries to correlate the findings of the different workers in this field is utterly confused. The chief findings relate to

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