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Article
August 5, 1916

THE REACTION OF THE PANCREAS AND THE PANCREATIC JUICE

JAMA. 1916;LXVII(6):438-439. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02590060038013
Abstract

It is generally accepted that the chemical reaction of living tissues, like that of the blood, is slightly alkaline or neutral. On impairment of circulation and oxidation, or on death of the tissues, an acid reaction quickly develops, owing to the accumulation of acid metabolites and waste products. In life the organs, like the blood, appear to have the power to maintain practical neutrality even under quite varied physiologic conditions. As applied to the pancreas, this general conception has recently been called in question in a series of papers by Long and Fenger.1 These investigators report that the living pancreas of all animals so far investigated has an acid reaction, whether tested by indicators, by titration, or by the electrical conductivity methods. The acidity is practically constant, and does not vary with the seasons or the animal's diet.

Most of the tests were made on press juice from the

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