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Article
October 21, 1916

IMMUNE HUMAN SERUM IN THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE POLIOMYELITIS

JAMA. 1916;LXVII(17):1211-1213. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02590170019006
Abstract

The question of the treatment of acute poliomyelitis has acquired special interest during the past few months because of the prevalence of the disease in the United States. While the administration of serum of persons who have had the disease has been suggested, still the number of cases so treated is so few as to warrant a brief report of the results in fifteen cases.

It is held that poliomyelitis is infectious. The changes in the central nervous system and its appendages, as well as elsewhere, appear to be of microbic origin, and the resulting edema and hemorrhage produce pressure sufficient to cause paralysis. Whatever the underlying mechanism of the process may be, resort to a treatment based on the accepted principles of immunity appears worthy of trial, and such treatment seems to be available, since human immune serum has been found to contain principles capable both of neutralizing the

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