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Article
April 24, 1915

DANGERS AND INCONSISTENCIES IN SOME NOTABLE SHORT - TIME TREATMENTS FOR DRUG ADDICTIONS

Author Affiliations

Physician in Charge of Drug Addictions, St. Francis Hospital; Assistant Neurologist, Western Pennsylvania Hospital; Instructor in Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine PITTSBURGH

JAMA. 1915;LXIV(17):1390-1392. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02570430022008
Abstract

The Harrison Antinarcotic Act has precipitated an unusual number of drug cases on our hands. It seems wise, therefore, to warn the profession against a routine following of some of the more notable short-time treatments—such as the Lambert-Towns treatment and others based on the belladonna group of drugs or their active principles. I began to use the Lambert treatment shortly after its publication in The Journal.1 Very soon, however, I found that, in the majority of cases, it was safer if modified. I have used it, with varying modifications, in a large series of cases and from the first have been a strong advocate of what is valuable in it. But there may be grave dangers in its use if applied as a routine to all comers, as seems to be advised by its promoters. There are patients who, owing to age or to general debility, are unable to

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