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Article
May 29, 1915

FULLER'S EARTH; ITS ADSORPTIVE POWER, AND ITS ANTIDOTAL VALUE FOR ALKALOIDS

Author Affiliations

Professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Illinois CHICAGO

From the Pharmacologic Laboratory of the College of Medicine of the University of Illinois.

JAMA. 1915;LXIV(22):1838-1845. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02570480034013
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  For several decades fuller's earth (Parsons1) has been used extensively for the removal of coloring matter from oils. It owes this use to its capacity for adsorbing basic colors from solutions, which resides in the finest particles of the clay. The union between the basic substance and the earth is believed to be physical, as it can be easily broken up by use of proper solvents.In 1910, John Uri Lloyd2 of Cincinnati discovered that the addition of fuller's earth to alkaloids greatly diminished or almost abolished their bitter taste and that most alkaloids could be quantitatively removed from solutions by means of it. Further research revealed that this activity resided in the finest particles of the earth, which Lloyd separated by elutriation from the coarser portion and to which the name "Lloyd's reagent" has been applied.In view of the theoretic interest as well as of

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