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Article
June 5, 1915

A SIMPLE MEANS OF OBTAINING SPECIMENS OF URINE FROM INFANTS

JAMA. 1915;LXIV(23):1908-1909. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.25710490001013

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Abstract

Routine urine analyses in an infant ward of a hospital disclose the fact that a substantial percentage of these little patients suffer from various kinds of urinary disturbances. Pyelitis and cystitis are common, nephritis by no means rare, as shown at necropsy, while acidosis and other metabolic disturbances are so directly reflected in the urine that, in the light of modern pediatrics, urine analyses are as important in infants as in older patients. The difficulty and inconvenience in procuring specimens of urine from babies, however, has doubtless caused much neglect in these cases.

A method commonly used is to strap a test tube or glove finger over the urinary outlet by means of adhesive plaster. This is usually effective, but it is considerable trouble to apply, even in boys, while in girls it is extremely difficult. Repeated applications of adhesive are also apt to cause excoriations of the skin. Some

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