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Article
January 13, 1917

A CASE BEARING ON THE FUNCTION OF THE PITUITARY BODY

Author Affiliations

Professor of Pathology, University of Manitoba WINNIPEG, CANADA

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(2):111-113. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270010111012
Abstract

The pituitary body consists of two distinct parts, differing in development, in structure and in function. In this respect it bears a close resemblance to the suprarenal glands. The anterior part of the pituitary is developed from an invagination of the pharynx (Rathke's pouch), it is glandular in structure, and its function is that of a regulator of skeletal growth and sexual development. It is possible, moreover, that it may exert some influence on body temperature, for Cushing1 points out that a rise of temperature follows injection of extract of the anterior lobe in cases of anterior lobe deficiency. The posterior part, separated from the anterior part by the pars intermedia, is developed as a downgrowth from the floor of the third ventricle, shows in its structure traces of its nervous origin, and has a controlling influence over plain muscle generally, and also over carbohydrate metabolism.

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