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Article
January 13, 1917

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(2):122-125. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270010122018
Abstract

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SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1917

PHYSIOLOGIC ASPECTS OF THE WORKING DAY PROBLEM  The length of the working day has a preeminently physiologic bearing, and recently has assumed increased political prominence. Lee1 has presented the crux of the matter as follows: The eight-hour problem is primarily a problem of physiology; if the physiologic effects of any kind of labor are injurious, the conditions of such labor should be changed. This is fundamental, and should precede any consideration of the economic and social effects resulting from a change of conditions, a basic fact which is continually overlooked.The most serious physiologic interference accompanying prolonged uninterrupted work is the familiar phenomenon of fatigue. Its existence is generally recognized, yet

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