[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.163.92.62. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 7, 1917

THE REACTION AFTER INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS OF FOREIGN PROTEIN

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the medical clinic of Dr. Joseph L. Miller at Cook County Hospital.

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(1):20-23. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590280022007
Abstract

During the last two years, intravenous injections of foreign proteins have been used as a therapeutic agent in various conditions. Satisfactory results have been reported in a variety of acute infections. In these reports the phenomena accompanying the injection are taken up as incidental to the presentation of the therapeutic results.

With the intravenous injection of a foreign protein, a certain reaction takes place which is fairly constant in all cases. For the purpose of observing the phenomena following the injections, careful records were made in the cases of acute articular rheumatism in which this treatment was employed. Observations were also made in a few cases of chronic arthritis and lobar pneumonia.

The foreign protein employed in these cases was typhoid vaccine. The vaccine was prepared from an active culture, grown twenty-four hours on agar slants, washed off with saline solution, killed by heating at 70 C. for two hours,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×