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Article
July 14, 1917

SANITATION IN THE TRENCHES

Author Affiliations

Lieutenant-Colonel, United States Army; Professor of Military Hygiene, Army Medical School, WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(2):81-87. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590290003002
Abstract

From professional friends in the medical centers who are most in touch with the younger physicians I learn that there is a great demand among the latter for medicomilitary literature concerning the present war. Naturally, planning to take up at an early date the duties of what they are beginning to realize is practically a specialty to which our medical colleges have heretofore given no attention, as intelligent professional men and as patriotic citizens they are eager for information that will enable them competently to fill the military offices to which they shortly expect appointment, and to "do their bit," however small, in an adequate and self-satisfying way.

At present, unfortunately, there is a great lack of literature along these lines. Physicians abroad, both at home and afield, are all more or less engaged in the work of the war and have had little time to write; and what has

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