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Article
July 21, 1917

TRACHOMA A CIVIC AS WELL AS A MILITARY PROBLEM

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(3):227-228. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590300067025
Abstract

To the Editor:  —At a meeting of the Section on Ophthalmology of the American Medical Association last June, a resolution was passed requesting the government to be on the watch for cases of trachoma among voluntary and conscripted candidates for the army.1To exclude victims of trachoma from the ranks is no doubt desirable, but in so doing, first, the army will lose many men who in short time (from three to six months) could be cured of trachoma and be made safe as far as contagion is concerned. Secondly, these excluded persons return to their homes, continue to live under unhygienic conditions, and cannot be kept under supervision. The fact must also be borne in mind that many of these persons are employed in factories where they disseminate trachoma among their fellow workers. In this connection, it may be interesting to recall two facts, first, that trachoma was

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