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Article
March 10, 1917

A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THICK AND THIN BLOOD SMEARS FOR DIAGNOSIS OF MALARIAL FEVERS

Author Affiliations

CROSSETT, ARK.

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(10):771-772. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270030103010
Abstract

The difficulties of specific diagnosis in chronic malaria, as well as in many of the more acute manifestations, has been appreciated by physicians generally, and more especially by public health investigators in connection with index determinations. With discovery of the malarial organism by Laveran, in 1880, it first became possible accurately to differentiate malaria from other febrile conditions, and later to seperate the three types of infection. The well known thin smear methods of blood examination have distinct advantages for purposes of morphologic study; with the presence in a large proportion of cases, however, of but few parasites in the peripheral circulation, requiring at times hours of study for demonstration, methods have been sought whereby a larger amount of blood could be examined so as to make possible increased accuracy of diagnosis. The first use of thick films was made by Ross, and the technic was modified later by Ruge

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