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Article
March 17, 1917

THE PRACTICAL USES OF RECENT WORK ON THE INTERNAL EARTO THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER, THE OTOLOGIST, OPHTHALMOLOGIST, SYPHILOLOGIST, THE NEUROLOGIST AND SURGEON

Author Affiliations

Laryngologist, Philadelphia General Hospital; Instructor in Neuro-Otology, University of Pennsylvania Medical School PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(11):829-831. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270030161006

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Abstract

Any work in physiology may be regarded as an "interesting study," but from the standpoint of most of us in the practice of medicine, research work of any kind becomes of greatest importance when it proves useful in clinical work. The cry is, "That is all very interesting, but of what use is it? How does it help sick people?" To answer this question is the spirit of this paper. A study of the relation of the ear to the central nervous system not only opens a new field for investigation in physiology, but also furnishes information of diagnostic value in the every-day examination of patients. Although it is essentially and entirely an ear study, and is useful in the analysis of ear conditions, yet recent investigations have shown it to be of value in medical and surgical diagnosis. These investigations include a study of patients of the Philadelphia Hospital,

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