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Article
July 6, 1907

DOES THE OPACITY OF INCIPIENT CATARACT EVER REGAIN TRANSPARENCY?

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(1):10-13. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320010010002a
Abstract

Our problem is not the mere restoration of vision in a cataractous eye, as this may occur from absorption of the cortex or in traumatic opacity; nor is it the clearing of a diffuse cloudiness of the lens, as this has been observed to follow correction of eyestrain. It is rather the partial or complete transformation of opaque striæ with diffuse opacity into clear lens. Such opacities are seen in the lenses of individuals past middle life, and in some cases are associated with such general diseases as diabetes, Bright's disease, syphilis, and arteriosclerosis; some with uncorrected refractive defects, and others with as yet undefined conditions.

Progress, in the non-surgical management of incipient cataract, calls for the settlement of two questions:

First. Do the opaque striæ of incipient cataract ever become transformed into transparent lens?

Second. What are the conditions under which transformation occurs?

If the striated opacity of incipient

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