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Article
July 6, 1907

SUPRARENAL HEMORRHAGE; AN UNUSUAL CAUSE OF SUDDEN DEATH.

Author Affiliations

SONYEA, N. Y.

From the Laboratory of the Craig Colony for Epileptics.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(1):19-21. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320010019002e
Abstract

I am indebted to Dr. B. F. Andrews, interne at the Colony, for the history and clinical notes in the following case:

Patient.  —G. D., male, aged 25, a native of New York and by occupation a farmer, was admitted to the Craig Colony in 1901, at the age of 19 years.

Family History.  —Mother was hysterical both before and after marriage; possibly tuberculous. Father had "fainting spells" between his sixteenth and thirty-fifth years; was subject to rheumatism. Both parents are said, to have been subject to headaches.

Personal History.  —Was a strong healthy baby. "Worm fits" at age of 3 years. Epilepsy said to have begun at the age of 15; history blank states cause to have been worms, but none were seen. Grand mal attacks, both diurnal and nocturnal. It is stated that the right arm is "most frequently involved." When admitted, the patient was feebleminded. No abnormalities

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