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Article
July 6, 1907

THE ROLE OF THE WOOD-TICK (DERMACENTOR OCCIDENTALIS) IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER,AND THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF LOCAL ANIMALS TO THIS DISEASE—A PRELIMINARY REPORT.

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO.

From the Pathologic Laboratory of the University of Chicago.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(1):24-27. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320010024002g
Abstract

THE TECHNIC OF FEEDING TICKS ON THE GUINEA-PIG.  Many embarrassments have been encountered in experiments in which the tick is allowed to feed on the guinea-pig. There are few spots on the body of the latter which he can not reach with his teeth or with the toes of his hind legs, and, since the bite of the tick is very irritating, ticks are frequently dislodged or killed, provided the guinea-pig is not restrained properly. The tick is prone to attach itself to the delicate hairless skin behind the ear or to the ventral surface of the body in the vicinity of the mammary glands. When in the former position it is readily dislodged by the nails of the pig's hind feet, and when in the latter position may be killed by biting. In order to obviate some of these accidents and to prevent the loss of valuable ticks, the

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