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Article
April 28, 1917

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(17):1262-1265. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270040250022
Abstract

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SATURDAY, APRIL 28, 1917 

THE FOOD SUPPLY  If the American people fail to appreciate the supreme importance of the food supply in relation to the present world war and the inevitable consequences which are liable to confront our own nation, now at war, if the food problem is treated with characteristic American indifference, it will scarcely be the fault of printers' ink or inadequate publicity. The lessons of the distressing European situation in respect to the shortage of food among both belligerents and neutrals will have been taught in vain if this country remains blind to the dangers of either ignorance or unconcern in this matter. A proposed war loan of seven billions of dollars

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