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Article
May 5, 1917

AN EPIDEMIC OF SEPTIC SORE THROAT DUE TO MILK

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Mayo Foundation.

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(18):1305-1307. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270050007002
Abstract

During the early part of March, there occurred in Galesville, Wis., a town of about 1,200 inhabitants, a sudden outbreak of severe sore throat. The symptoms were so severe, and the outbreak so sudden, that the authorities and physicians became alarmed.

March 12, one of us was urged to investigate the epidemic. The symptoms were strikingly like those in the milk-borne epidemic of septic sore throat which occurred in Chicago during the winter of 1911-1912 studied by Capps and Miller, and Davis and Rosenow. The relation of the cases to the milk supply was suspected, and pasteurization or boiling of the milk was advised pending the investigation. March 15, it had become apparent that the cases occurred chiefly in families who used milk from a certain dairy. Inspection of the throat and microscopic examination of a smear from the tonsils in the first case recalled at once the picture that

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