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Article
May 5, 1917

ENDEMIC INDEX OF MALARIA IN THE NORTHERN SACRAMENTO VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

Author Affiliations

Assistant Epidemiologist and Assistant Director, respectively, Bureau of Communicable Diseases, California Stale Board of Health BERKELEY, CALIF.

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(18):1319-1320. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270050021010
Abstract

Although for many years malaria has been known to be prevalent in the great central valleys of California and the foothills adjacent to them, no systematic attempt has been made to study the types and endemicity of the disease prior to 1915. However, W. B. Herms,1 associate professor of parasitology in the University of California and consulting parasitologist of the California State Board of Health, has done a large amount of educational and mosquito control work. Early in 1915, Dr. K. F. Meyer2 and Dr. E. L. Walker, associate professors of tropical medicine in the George Williams Hooper Foundation for Medical Research, began an investigation in order to determine the endemicity of malaria and the types of mosquitoes involved. After several weeks this investigation was discontinued.

In September, 1915, after conferring with Professor Herms, we submitted to Dr. W. A. Sawyer, secretary of the California State Board of

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