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Article
August 10, 1907

THE RELATIVE PREVALENCE OF DISEASE AMONG WHITE AND COLORED TROOPS.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(6):500. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.02530060050005

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Abstract

In view of the questioned expediency of retaining in service colored troops, in opposition to the sentiment in so many localities against having them in the local garrison, it becomes interesting to compare the relative efficiency of the white and colored troops as affected by disease. For troops serving in the United States proper, a study of the statistics for many years shows that the colored troops almost uniformly have a much lower admission, discharge and non-effective rate for disease, while their death rate is much higher than that of the whites, usually more than twice as great. Suicide is also very much more common among white troops, but, on the other hand, homicide is not nearly so frequent. As causes of non-effectiveness the diseases which are of more importance among white troops are alcoholism and venereal diseases, typhoid fever, malaria, diarrhea, dysentery and catarrhal diseases of the respiratory system.

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