[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.166.48.3. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 29, 1917

OILED GAUZE AND THE ABSORBING POWER OF COTTON SPONGES

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Pharmacologic Laboratory of the Western Reserve University, School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(13):1073-1074. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590400033010
Abstract

"Nonadhering surgical gauze" was introduced by H. E. Fisher.1 It was prepared by saturating the gauze with a soft paraffin mixture made by the addition of petrolatum, lanolin or stearic acid to paraffin. Fisher asserts especially that the blocking of the fibers prevents matting with secretions and débris; that it prevents adherence of the gauze, and that the granulations of tissue repair are not injured when the dressing is removed.

While working on paraffin bandages, I became interested in the permeability of such bandages as influenced by various waxes and oily preparations. A series of gauzes of loose and close mesh were prepared by impregnating them with paraffins of different hardness, ranging from hard paraffin to liquid petrolatum.

As the result of experiments I find that "oiled gauze," that is, gauze that is impregnated with liquid petrolatum, holds out considerable promise of usefulness. Cotton sponges wrapped in this oiled

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×