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September 29, 1917

LARREY, THE ORIGINATOR OF RAPID EVACUATION OF THE WOUNDED

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(13):1084-1085. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590400044019
Abstract

When Napoleon wrote in his will: "I leave 100,000 francs to Larrey—the most virtuous man I have known," he meant not only probity and honor, but virtue in the Roman sense. Larrey, the soldier, was the dutiful, reliable, courageous man of Roman type; Larrey, the physician, was the big human personality of large benevolent impulses, the kind of medical officer who actually carried a wounded soldier on his back in emergency. He was the generous, warm-blooded meridional, who came up to Paris from the Pyrenees, the type of Frenchman depicted in the canvasses of Ingres and David d'Angers. No French army surgeon has been so well beloved by his comrades since Ambroise Paré. He was one of the brilliant group of military surgeons whom Napoleon knew so well how to gather around him—Larrey, Percy, Desgenettes, a memorable trio. Larrey's system of movable field hospitals or flying ambulances (ambulances volantes) was

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