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October 21, 1893

PURULENT OPHTHALMIA FROM THE STANDPOINT OF ITS SPECIFIC MICROBIO CAUSE;WITH A PLEA FOR A MORE ENERGETIC, RATIONAL, ABORTIVE TREATMENT WHERE POSSIBLE. Read before the Section on Ophthalmology, at the Forty-fourth Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association at Milwaukee.

Author Affiliations

SENIOR SURGEON EYE AND EAR DEPARTMENT, CENTRAL FREE DISPEN SARY; OPHTHALMOLOGIST TO THE NEUROLOGICAL CLINIC, AND ASSISTANT TO THE CHAIR OF OPHTHALMOLOGY IN RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE, CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1893;XXI(17):609-613. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.02420690017001f
Abstract

(Concluded from page 564.)

Mauriac decides that "the abortive treatment is indicated and has some chances of succeeding in acute gonorrhea only during the first hours of its outset." Diday believes: "That in the early stage every gonorrhea can be aborted," and "that the abortive treatment is neither locally nor constitutionally dangerous." Two methods may be followed: a strong solution may be used for a short time in the urethra or a weaker solution may be left in contact for a longer time. A 5 per cent. solution of nitrate of silver is allowed to remain in the urethra from forty to ninety seconds, according to the pain produced. A free discharge occurs after two days, and as a result of the burning may continue for four days and then gradually ceases in a few days more. The abortive treatment is considered worthy of trial in view of the serious

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