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Article
August 24, 1907

THE OPERATION OF GASTRO-JEJUNOSTOMY AND ITS PHYSIOLOGIC EFFECTS.

Author Affiliations

Surgical Staff, London Temperance Hospital; Hunterian Professor, Royal College of Surgeons, England. LONDON, ENGLAND.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(8):657-662. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320080025001h
Abstract

When your distinguished President of last year conveyed to me a cordial invitation to be present at this meeting of the American Medical Association, I accepted at once, thinking of the opportunity which I should have of seeing for myself and profiting from the work of the many in your country whose fame has spread across the sea. When I came to seek for a subject on which to address you, however, I realized the rashness of my ready compliance. So much work has been done here on that branch of surgery in which I am especially interested that I felt that, were I to dwell on any purely surgical aspect of gastric disease, I should be going over ground already familiar to you, and so should be trespassing too far on that indulgence and leniency which I have heard you so invariably extend to those who are your guests.

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