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Article
June 9, 1917

TRANSFUSION OF BLOOD BY THE CITRATE METHOD

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Medical Clinic of the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(23):1677-1680. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270060085002
Abstract

Anticoagulants have been of great value and interest to laboratory workers for many years, but their introduction into clinical medicine is of recent date. Engelmann,1 in 1911, stated that he had injected 0.3 gm. of herudin intravenously in each of fourteen eclamptic patients without toxic symptoms. Satterlee and Hooker2 used small amounts of herudin in transfusion with their cannula-pipet method, and observed no ill results. Abel, Rowntree and Turner,3 working on methods of vividiffusion and plasmaphaeresis, concluded that herudin prepared by their method was nontoxic in quantities sufficient to prevent coagulation of the blood of dogs. Turner, Marshall and Lamson4 studies a commercial preparation of herudin and found it sufficiently toxic to cause death in dogs when given intravenously in doses of from 25 to 30 mg. per kilogram of body weight. Marshall5 studied this preparation and concluded that the toxic substance was probably some

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