[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.150.215. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 23, 1917

THE CARE OF CRIPPLES AS A PROBLEM FOR EACH INDIVIDUAL STATE

Author Affiliations

Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Chicago Policlinic; Assistant Professor of Surgery, Rush Medical College; Orthopedic Surgeon to Children's Memorial Hospital and the Home for Destitute Crippled Children CHICAGO

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(25):1881-1882. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270060289001
Abstract

In every state of the Union there is a large number of crippled persons who are not receiving proper attention. Many of them have no medical or surgical treatment whatever, and most of them have little opportunity to acquire a good education. Entirely aside from their own mental and physical sufferings, they constitute an enormous economic disadvantage and loss to their families and communities and to the state. It has been clearly demonstrated that most of these persons, by proper treatment, may be restored to a condition of usefulness, and that many of them, by proper education, may become able to earn a fair income.

Why is it, then, that only four of our states have established institutions in which cripples may be treated and educated? Is it because the legislators are unwilling to adopt so good a business proposition and so broad a charity? Or is it because the

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×