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Article
November 3, 1917

CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS OF LITHIASIS OF THE UPPER URINARY TRACT

Author Affiliations

Genito-Urinary Surgeon to Outpatients, Massachusetts General Hospital BOSTON

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(18):1490-1492. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590450010004
Abstract

If in this symposium the word "clinical" is to be used in distinction from "roentgen-ray" diagnosis, I shall have to throw up the sponge at once, because the absolute diagnosis of stones in the kidney or ureter without the use of the roentgen ray is impossible. A stone may be present anywhere in the upper urinary tract, either without giving any sign or symptom of its presence, or on the other hand, it may present any of a great variety of signs and symptoms such as would point to any of the various urinary troubles, or even such as would strongly suggest a diagnosis far removed from the urinary tract. Then again, a patient may present what we have been pleased to call a "typical" story of renal colic, bladder irritability, etc., and even show pus and blood in the urine, and yet no stone be present. This is nicely

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