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Article
June 23, 1917

THE RELATION OF LOW BLOOD PRESSURE TO A FATAL TERMINATION IN TRAUMATIC SHOCK

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Physiology, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons; Graduate Student in Physiology NEW YORK

From the Department of Physiology, Columbia University.

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(25):1892-1893. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270060300005
Abstract

It is desirable, in view of the cooperation on the part of several of the physiologic laboratories of the United States in the work on the nature and treatment of traumatic shock arising from war conditions, that the results of such work be made public as early as possible in brief communications. Such is our reason for the form of the present note.

The experimental facts, in part unpublished and in part drawn from previous work, are as follows:

1. When the cells of the brain and medulla oblongata are deprived of blood for a period of from ten to twenty minutes, a change in the staining reactions of the cells is demonstrable if the brain and upper portion of the spinal cord are removed some minutes after the circulation to the head has been restored.1

2. There is a greater susceptibility of these previously damaged cells to strychnin.

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