[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 3, 1917

THE VALUE OF MAKING LEUKOCYTE COUNTS ON THE URINE IN INFECTIONS OF THE KIDNEY

Author Affiliations

Urologist, Presbyterian Hospital; Genito-Urinary Surgeon, Alexian Brothers' Hospital CHICAGO

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(18):1505-1508. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590450025008
Abstract

During the past three years we have been controlling all cases of renal infection, including tuberculosis, that have been admitted to the Presbyterian Hospital, by making leukocyte counts on the urine. It has seemed to us that this was the only way one could obtain definite and exact information relative to the severity of the infectious process, and furthermore, it has been giving us an idea of the improvement in the patient's condition while under treatment.

The idea of making leukocyte counts on the urine is not a new one. Its routine use, however, in the control of urinary infections, hand in hand with bacteriologic controls, I do not think has become an established procedure. I am not familiar with any clinic or laboratory that employs the leukocyte count on the urine as a routine in its daily work, so that I believe the statement is justified, that, as a

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×