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Article
September 7, 1907

THE SYMPTOMS AND DIAGNOSIS OF STRANGULATION OF THE INTESTINE.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Surgery in the Philadelphia Polyclinic. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(10):843-846. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320100031001i
Abstract

The development of the operative surgery of the abdomen has created in the minds of surgeons such an assurance of success that they are liable to neglect the study of diagnosis and to resort too cheerily to exploratory investigation of lesions in this cavity. Physicians, on the other hand, being more or less unfamiliar with the innocuousness of aseptic inspection of the abdominal contents, lose valuable time in fruitless efforts to overcome mechanical impediments to peristalsis. Patients would have a fuller measure of scientific aid in their dire extremity, if surgeons could profit by frequent opportunity to see cases of intestinal obstruction early enough to study initial symptoms. On the other hand, many lives would undoubtedly be saved, if physicians realized the futility of wasting time in the effort to settle diagnostic problems, when the fecal current and perhaps the blood circulation are stopped by mechanical causes, demanding instant manipulative

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