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Article
December 9, 1893

HERNIA IN CHILDREN.Read in the Section on Diseases of Children, at the Forty-fourth Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association.

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND, OHIO. PROFESSOR OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY IN THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT UNIVERSITY OF WOOSTER, CLEVELAND, OHIO; VISITING SURGEON TO UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL; ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON TO CLEVELAND HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN; LATE HOUSE SURGEON, HOSPITAL FOR RUPTURED AND CRIPPLED CHILDREN, NEW YORK CITY, ETC.

JAMA. 1893;XXI(24):888-890. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.02420760018001h

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Abstract

Hernia being a very disabling affection to a relatively large per cent. of the human family, and the frequent cause of death both in aduiis and children, is sufficient reason for its being considered here to-day.

Frequency and Varieties.—I have mentioned that it affects a comparatively large per cent. of mankind. It has been variously estimated that the affection is found in from one-eighth to one-sixteenth of the entire population. About one death occurring in every six hundred is due to hernia. Almost every aperture leading directly or indirectly to the abdominal cavity is liable more or less frequently to become the point of exit of a hernia. In the order of frequency of occurrence they may be named as follows: inguinal, umbilical, femoral, ventral, obturator, ischiatic, perineal, diaphragmatic, and a few other rare forms.

For every ventral hernia there are about four femoral, five umbilical and sixty-two inguinal herniæ.

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