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Article
December 9, 1893

LIABILITY OF A PHYSICIAN FOR SELLING INTOXICATING LIQUORS IN IOWA.

JAMA. 1893;XXI(24):900. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.02420760030009

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Abstract

The Iowa statute which prohibits the sale of intoxicating liquors, makes an exception in favor of licensed physicians, permitting them to dispense, in good faith, such liquors as medicine to patients actually sick and under their treatment at the time of such dispensing. The defendant in the case of State v. Field, decided by the Supreme Court of Iowa, Oct. 5, 1893, was a physician and kept a drug store. The evidence showed that people would go to his store and ask for "red medicine" which meant whisky, or "white medicine," which meant alcohol, and obtain it. A theory of the defense was that whatever was obtained was prescribed by the dispenser as medicine. The trial court instructed the jury that if it found that the liquor was sold and dispensed, as by a physician to patients actually sick and under his treatment, to acquit. This the Supreme Court said

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