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Article
September 14, 1907

THE RATE OF ELIMINATION OF URIC ACID IN MAN.

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Sheffield Laboratory of Physiologic Chemistry, Yale University.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(11):896-901. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320110008001a
Abstract

Recent years have yielded substantial contributions to our knowledge of purin metabolism and the genesis and elimination of uric acid in the animal organism.1 The studies of Sivén and of Burian and Schur taught the distinction between endogenous and exogenous components in connection with uric acid excretion, and they have emphasized the probability that under ordinary conditions the endogenous purin output is fairly constant for the same individual. Quite lately evidence has accumulated to show that under exceptional circumstances, such as starvation or a low nitrogenous diet, the absolute quantity of endogenous uric acid eliminated may be diminished.2 The widely accepted law of constant uric acid excretion on a diet free from purin derivatives has thus again been called into question, and further investigation will be necessary to explain the discrepancies noted under different dietary conditions. A further distinct advance in current conceptions regarding purin metabolism is indicated in the

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