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Article
December 16, 1893

THE TREATMENT OF DIPHTHERIA.Read before the Camden County (N. J.) Medical Society.

Author Affiliations

PHYSICIAN TO COOPER HOSPITAL; LECTURER ON MEDICAL NURSING IN NEW JERSEY TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY.

JAMA. 1893;XXI(25):926-928. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.02420770016001g

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Abstract

I desire to call your attention, as announced in the program, to the treatment of diphtheria. The subject is full of interest, not alone from the past and present prevalence of the disease, but from the startling fact that, despite the great advancement in sanitary science, diphtheria is more continuously present than any of the acute, contagious diseases. Further than this, it can be said that diphtheria, despite sanitary science, has steadily advanced, and, for several years past, has maintained the character of an epidemic, in this section of the country. I shall speak from the standpoint that diphtheria is primarily a local disease; that systemic infection is secondary to the local invasion, and beg to call your attention to the hygienic treatment, the medical treatment and the preventive treatment.

THE HYGIENIC TREATMENT.

In the hygienic treatment, the selection and care of the sick-room and the care of the patient,

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