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Article
September 14, 1907

PUBLIC PROVISION FOR INCIPIENT CASES OF TUBERCULOSIS, SANATORIA AND DISPENSARIES.

Author Affiliations

Medical Director, Pottenger Sanatorium. MONROVIA, CAL.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(11):905-907. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320110017001d
Abstract

The prevalence of tuberculosis; its fatal tendency when sufficiently advanced to manifest its presence by symptoms, physical signs and tests, when not treated; the encouragement afforded to sufferers when properly treated; the disease being the most amenable to treatment of any of the chronic diseases, especially in the incipient stage; the well-known source of infection and its means of communication; together with the means of prevention; and, lastly, the practical results which have been achieved as shown by the decreased mortality where efforts have been made to treat and control the spread of the disease, are sufficient reasons for assuming without argument that the public should make provision for the accomplishment of these ends.

The treatment must be carried out in sanatoria, dispensaries and the home, or by combinations of these methods, according to the condition of the patient.

By public provision, in this title, I understand provision by the

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